Text 22 Jul 284,996 notes to every bug i have ever killed i am sorry :/

durbikins:

…sorry that your bitch asses came into my house uninvited

(Source: nahr4lma)

Video 22 Jul 10,933 notes

starkexpos:

It’s perfectly obvious where the missing pages are. He’s given them to Marcus Brody.

This is one of my favorite cuts in the history of fucking cinema.

(Source: iamnevertheone)

Video 22 Jul 15,591 notes
Video 22 Jul 46,873 notes

tammalee:

asylum-art:

Dietmar Voorworld is an artist who takes rocks, pebbles and leaves he finds in nature and turns them into memorable pieces of circular land art.

 

I love all of these so much. I used to spend hours sorting through rocks.

Photo 22 Jul 817 notes goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.
Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.
"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.
"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.
Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.
Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.
One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.
Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.
Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

Sixth-Grader’s Science Fair Finding Shocks Ecologists

When 12-year-old Lauren Arrington heard about her sixth-grade science project, she knew she wanted to study lionfish. Growing up in Jupiter, Fla., she saw them in the ocean while snorkeling and fishing with her dad.

Her project showed that the lionfish can survive in nearly fresh water. The results blew away professional ecologists. The invasive species has no predators on the Florida coast, so if they were to migrate upstream in rivers, they could pose a threat to the ecosystem.

"Scientists were doing plenty of tests on them, but they just always assumed they were in the ocean," Lauren, now 13, tells NPR’s Kelly McEvers. "So I was like, ‘Well, hey guys, what about the river?’ "

In the beginning, she wanted to conduct her test by placing the lionfish in cages at different points in the river, but she had to simplify the project.

"It was just a small, sixth-grade project, and I really didn’t have all the tools necessary," she says. Her dad, who has a Ph.D. in fish ecology, suggested that she put the fish in tanks instead.

Lauren then put six different lionfish in six different tanks where she could watch her subjects closely. Lauren was given a strict set of rules by the science fair organizers. The most important one: Her fish could not die.

Lionfish had been found to live in water with salt levels of 20 parts per thousand. But no one knew that they could live in water salinity below that.

One of the six lionfish was her control fish, and the rest were the experimental fish. Every night for eight days, she would lower the salinity 5 parts per thousand in the experimental tanks. On the eighth day of her experiment, she found her experimental fish were living at 6 parts per thousand. She was amazed.

Her research did not stop there. Craig Layman, an ecology professor at North Carolina State University, confirmed Lauren’s results. “He credited a sixth-grader for coming up with his idea,” Lauren says ecstatically. Layman’s findings were published this year in the science journal Environmental Biology of Fishes. Lauren is mentioned in the acknowledgments.

Lauren’s father says he talks about science with her a lot. “We’re a science bunch of dorks in our family,” he tells McEvers.

Text 22 Jul 115 notes

kanafinwhy:

Also, I’m laughing because:

"But when the Valar entered into Eä, they were at first astounded and at a loss, for it was as if naught was yet made which they had seen in vision, and all was yet on point to begin and yet unshaped, and it was dark."

Valar, you didn’t read the small print: “One World. Some assembly required.”

Video 22 Jul 8,678 notes
Video 22 Jul 1,733 notes
The kitchen's under enormous strain, we are almost out of wine.
How long do you think they will be with us?

(Source: whereisyourpippinnow)

Video 21 Jul 493 notes

dream-of-another-worlds:

LOTR meme - 1/8 Characters

                                - Faramir

Video 21 Jul 284 notes

tosquinha:

Music of the Ainur - also known as Melkor what are you doing stop it NO!

This choir from right to left: Vána, Oromë, Tulkas, Nessa, Estë, Irmo, Vairë, Námo, Nienna, Ulmo, Aulë, Yavanna, Manwë, Varda and Melkor.


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